Stick out your tongue!

What scientists know about the microcosmos of your tongue's flora could help keep people healthy. In this opinion piece, genomics expert Toni Gabaldón, explains how crowdsourcing samples of microbes from people's tongue will contribute to advancing our understanding of the flora in our mouth. Read on about this exciting citizen science project. Read more [...]
This post was viewed 0 times.

Contently’s Shane Snow: the key to using virtual soap boxes

Shane Snow is a freelance science and business journalist turned entrepreneur. In this interview with EuroScientist, he tells the story of how he co-founded Contently, a company initially created to help companies and brands to produce editorial and multimedia content telling their story. He also explains how the its business subsequently evolved into a technology company by incorporating the latest web tracking and analytics technologies to effectively distribute its content over the internet. Snow discusses the challenges of creating suitable content to help raise the profile of science, making a distinction between content that is promotional in nature and more critical journalistic content. Read more [...]
This post was viewed 0 times.

Special Issue: Hacking Bureaucracy

Welcome to our special issue of EuroScientist on hacking bureaucracy! Bureaucracy is spreading like the plague. It has now pervaded every aspect of scientists' lives; often to the point of choking the hardiest of investigators. Yet, technology has evolved so much so that it now offers simple solutions to cut trough the paperwork and make the scientific process more efficient, more collaborative and altogether smarter. Now, the time is right to take advantage of the opportunities afforded by technology and raise to the challenge of removing the hindrances brought by bureaucracy. Read more [...]
This post was viewed 0 times.

Time for serious hacking solutions in scholarly publishing

Hacking solutions to science problems are springing up everywhere. But what about the publishing industry? Where are the TripAdvisors for journals submissions, the Deliveroo for laboratory reagents? Clearly there are so many opportunities technology could bring to radically change the lives of scientists that it is a bit difficult to know where to start. Yet, the debate on the future of scholarly publishing may be about changing the incentives for researchers rather than embracing smart technology solutions. Find out from the experts in the industry who gathered in Frankfurt a few weeks ago. Read more [...]
This post was viewed 0 times.

Emmanuelle Charpentier: the strings attached to CRISPR/Cas9 success

Finding reliable funding in the course of a scientific career is difficult, even for the best scientists, says Emmanuelle Charpentier, head of regulation and infection biology at the Max-Planck-Institut in Berlin, Germany. Better known for her work on developing the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technique, she calls for an informed debate on the implications of her work and wishes to avoid giving into the media buzz without more in-depth reflection. In this first of a two-part series, Charpentiers shares her perspective in an authentic way. Read more [...]
This post was viewed 0 times.

Emmanuelle Charpentier: European research funding could do with less red tape

In the second instalment of a two-part series, Emmanuelle Charpentier, head of regulation and infection biology at the Max-Planck-Institut in Berlin, Germany, gives her opinion on the challenges in obtaining research funding in the current system in Europe. She also shares her views on how mobility can be hampered by bureaucracy. Finally, she points to the limited coherence for scientists pursuing a research career in Europe. Clearly, many efforts have yet to be made to improve the condition of scientists in Europe. Read more [...]
This post was viewed 0 times.

Self-organised scientific crowds to remedy research bureaucracy

In an era where research bureaucracy is the biggest burden bestowed upon scientists, some are seeking practical solutions. Inspired by the science of complex networks, new ways of harnessing the wisdom of the scientific community are emerging. This leads to new decision-making mechanisms to allocated the limited amount of resources, which is bypassing the biggest plague affecting the research endeavour. Michele Catanzaro investigates out-of-the-box solutions to this bureaucratic conundrum for Euroscientist. Read more [...]
This post was viewed 0 times.

Thomas Landrain interview: short-circuiting research

In this interview with EuroScientist, Thomas Landrain explains the story of La Paillasse, the open lab he founded in Paris six years ago. He has since developed a platform aiming to do open science by involving academics from across disciplines, engineers, designers and artists as well as curious citizens from around the world. The idea is to cut out the intermediaries and create a much more open way of doing research, enabling to fast-prototype solutions to scientific problems. Read more [...]
This post was viewed 0 times.

Gemma Milne interview: Fast-tracking research through cross-fertilisation

Science:Disrupt aims to bring people together, encouraging them to mix ideas and share their dreams, by organising events and stimulating discussions using articles and podcasts. Mixing people of various background is designed to facilitate cross-fertilisation of ideas from different disciplines and geographies and stimulate collaborative co-creation in science. In this interview with Euroscientist, Science:Disrupt co-founder Gemma Milne, explains how she was inspired by this type of multidisciplinary emulation already taking place in the tech start-up scene. Read more [...]
This post was viewed 0 times.

The controversial art of research management

The parachuting of a politician with no research experience into the coveted top position at INRA, France's national institute for agricultural research, last summer did not go down very well with the scientific community in the country. This raises the question of whether research institutions should be managed by professional research manger without first-hand experience of research? This issue keeps arising in discussions across European academic institutions. And it is unlikely to go away any time soon. Fiona Dunlevy investigates for EuroScientist. Read more [...]
This post was viewed 0 times.

Hans Wigzell interview: let the researchers free from bureaucrats

Changing the environment in which scientists evolve requires considerable cultural changes. In this exclusive interview, EuroScientist talks to Hans Wigzell, one of the most influential scientists in Europe and former president of the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. Although he recognises the necessity of bureaucrats in research institutions, he denounces their intervention as micromanagers of research. He also shares his views on what is required to, literally, let scientists free from bureaucrats. The solution he advocates involves strong leadership in research to remove the need for bureaucratic rules. Read more [...]
This post was viewed 0 times.

Top 10 YouTube science channels to enlighten and entertain

Thanks to YouTube it’s never been easier – or more entertaining – to learn about science. The EuroScientist team has browsed some of YouTube’s most popular and emerging science channels to bring you a list of our their ten favourites. This list is by no means exhaustive, so feel free to share your favourites in the comment box below! Read more [...]
This post was viewed 0 times.

European science conversations by the community, for the community